Tips on How to Pick the Best Running Race for You

Putting a race on your schedule is an excellent motivator no matter if you’re a novice or experienced runner. However, there are a number of important factors you need to consider before signing up for the event. To avoid wasting your time or money, it’s important that you choose your race carefully.

But no matter what you choose, training and choosing the right exercises is an important part of the process. As you run, you need to learn how to position your core to ensure long-term success. In this case, you might train using the best dumbbell shoulder exercises or best types of squats. With that in mind, the following tips can help you pick the best running race.

Choose a Distance

If your New Year’s resolution is to exercise more and lose weight, running can get you into shape. It’s also a sport that is highly addictive because it’s fun, and you don’t need a lot of equipment to take up the sport.

As you progress, you’ll be ready to get a few races under your belt. However, selecting the right distance is dependent on your fitness level. You may also want to consider future goals.

If you’re at a 5K level, and you want to run a marathon, you want to get some race experience and a solid training program in place. If you’re a beginner, you can start with shorter distances such as a 5K or 10K. If you would like to add a half marathon or full marathon, you’ll need at least three to six months to prepare for the race.

Ask for Suggestions

If you’re in a running group or you have friends who have a passion for running, you can ask them for some suggestions to see which races that they’ve enjoyed most. They’ll be able to give you a firsthand experience on the type of course, skillset, water station frequency and number of runners typically involved in the race.

Consider When you Would Like to Train and Run the Race

If you have a preference for the time of year that you would like to run, there are races to fit any schedule across the globe. For those who prefer the cooler climates, races in the spring and early summer may be ideal, as you don’t have to worry about running in the heat.

To best prepare for the race, you want to limit your treadmill running and designate most of it to the outdoors as possible. It also helps to train in the type of weather conditions that you’ll be racing in.

If you’re from the Midwest and planning a race in Florida, going from the extreme cold to warmer temperatures can be a shock to the body. If you’re planning a marathon, you can coordinate your races with your training schedule such as a 5K, 10K, half marathon and marathon.

Select a Destination

When it comes to running races, the world is your oyster. You’ll find everything from Disneyland and running through the winery of Napa Valley to Honolulu and Europe, so you need to take your pick.

Before you select, you need to take into consideration problems such as jet lag issues, language barriers, sleeping in another bed and eating foods that you may not be familiar with.

If you like a predictable routine when running, choosing something local may be better suited for you. This allows you to forego any pre-race travel jitters. You can do your own research to determine the reviews and what other runners have to say about the particular race you would like to participate in.

How is the Terrain?

The course of a race is especially important to a runner who is thinking about running a race. While choosing something scenic can be nice, you have to consider if you’re willing to put up with some hills.

If you’re not very interested in the beauty, but you’re looking to run your fastest race, you’ll want to look for flat terrain. Dependent on your goals and achievements, you’ll want to check the course’s terrain before you sign up for the race. Most websites will have a view of the course and comments about its difficulty. You can also go in search of the course elevation and description.

You might also like

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More