Does Filtering Water Make You Drink More?

We are lucky in most parts of the western world to have water than pours when we turn a tap, that won’t kill us if we drink it. We do know this. But it doesn’t mean that the water from the tap tastes good to drink, or that we want to drink all the chemicals and additives that are in our supplied water.

There is a magic figure of “8 cups” of water that humans are supposed to drink in order to be fit and healthy, but so many people struggle to drink this unless it comes in a hot and caffeinated form. Why? Because water from the tap generally tastes of chemicals, and it really isn’t nice to drink.

Drink More – Drink Well

Marketing companies know that water tastes bad, and have come up with some ingenious ways to encourage you to become their consumer. You can buy pre-bottled water infused with herbs, flowers, fruits – all with added vitamins, minerals and unpronounceable ‘natural’ additives.

You can spend thousands getting a purifier installed in your kitchen which does everything except wash the dishes. But in reality, all you really need is something simple that is going to allow you to enjoy drinking water. This is where you want to look at easy options to have your water filtered so that it tastes nice, without the need to simply add flavours to make it drinkable.

Review site like Best Water Filter Pitcher – access healthy drinks and allow you to work out what the best option to fit your lifestyle. The ultimate goal is to help you increase your water consumption, but you still want to make sure that you are getting value for money.

Remove Or Add?

Many of the bottled water that you can purchase off the shelve has a range of ingredients added to it in order to make it taste pleasant. Which defeats the purpose of drinking water, you may as well drink a cup of herbal tea.

By using a water filter you are removing any pollutants that are found in tap water, either that have been added from the water treatment plant or just the bugs and fine particles that accumulate in your household water pipes.

Although you can invest in a water filter that attaches to you kitchen sink, these usually need to be plumbed in, they still need to have a regular filter change and if you move (or just go on holiday) you will be leaving your drinkable water behind.

So yes, you do want to use a filter to remove excess taste and chemicals from your drinking water, but unless you intend to be in that house for the next 20 years, you can also look at flexible options like water pitchers that have a built in filter.

How Much Water Do I Need?

Generally the idea is that you should be drinking around 1/2 gallon of water a day  – which is where the 8 glasses idea comes from https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/how-much-water-should-you-drink-per-day. Increasing your water intake can help with weight loss, increased energy levels, increased concentration, and can help kidney function. Of course, if your water is not healthy, these positive effects won’t be occurring.

Does Filtering Water Really Work?

In short – yes it does. But it will depend on what exactly you are filtering out and the type of filter. Most home and portable filters, whether installed or an easy to use pitcher style filter generally use a carbon filter (click here).

What this means is that the water you drink is first flushed through a system of activated carbon. Carbon filters can remove chlorine, sediment and organic compounds, but are less effective for removing certain minerals and salts.

When you are looking at investing in a water filter you will want to consider how large it is, a personal water filter that is contained in a water bottle you can carry around is an option, but you might prefer to have a ½ gallon pitcher that stays cool in your fridge.

Also consider how fast the water will flow through the filter. Often the faster water passes through the filter the fewer compounds are removed, but this is not always the case so check with the manufacturer when you buy.

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