How to Successfully Negotiate the Cost of Your Gym Membership

First time gym goers often make the mistake of just agreeing to whatever basic price that an employee quotes for them. The reality is that memberships at gyms are highly negotiable. All you need to get these great prices is a bit of knowledge and some improved negotiation skills. Use these tips to get the best deal possible on your gym membership.

Know the Cost of Other Gyms in the Area

It is important to shop around a little bit and find out what various gyms in your area charge for a membership because you can use this knowledge to negotiate a better deal. With an annual membership of less than $300, LA Fitness can easily be considered one of the most affordable health clubs on the market.

If you want to leverage that information, you could casually mention the cost of LA Fitness membership while negotiating with another fitness facility of your choosing and see if your desired gym can lower their prices to meet the other gym’s cost. Gym employees are more likely to lower the cost or provide extra upgrades when they feel like they might be about to lose you to one of their competitors.

Ask About Group Deals

Almost all gym chains have group memberships for families, businesses, or housemates. You might be able to pay less if you can get at least one other person to sign up with you. This is an easy way to get $5 to $10 knocked off your monthly bill. Some gyms may not post these types of deals on their website, but they are typically available if you ask.

Be Patient

A key part of negotiating is appearing calm and unrushed. You do not want to leave gym employees with the impression that you will agree to the first membership deal presented. If possible, try to visit the gym when you have plenty of free time. This will keep you from feeling pressured or rushed into agreeing to a bad deal.

Read the Contract Carefully

Be very wary of any gym deal that involves a premade contract because many locations will try to include a lot of hidden fees in the contract. You will need to read over the offer than an employee gives you to make sure there are not maintenance fees, key card fees, or other hidden costs that end up making your gym membership cost far more than it should. During negotiation, you need to focus on getting the best price overall instead of just the lowest monthly fee.

Pick the Right Time to Shop for Memberships

At most gyms, employees have a monthly sales quota they are encouraged to feel. Going to get a membership at the end of the month is often a good idea because the salesperson will be more willing to negotiate when they are feeling the pressure of an impending deadline. Try to talk to them in the middle of the week between 4 to 7 PM. This is the least busy time at the gym, so the salesperson will not feel like they have a lot of potential customers waiting around and willing to pay higher prices.

Ask for Perks and Upgrades

During negotiation, it never hurts to ask if you can get extra benefits from signing up. Some gyms may offer you a free trial period, gift cards to their juice bar, extra gym classes, or access to steam rooms and sports courts. If you are planning on using these services anyways, starting with a base membership and negotiating these add-ons can save some money.

Negotiate Special Deals for Upfront Payment

A lot of gyms deal with members who cancel or suddenly quit paying a membership, so they do value long term customers. Talk to the employee and see if you can negotiate a lower price or a few free months if you agree to go ahead and pay the full price upfront. Common deals offered to negotiators are 12 months for the price of 11 months or reduced enrollment fees.

Being able to negotiate a great price for your gym membership can help you save a lot of money on the long run. Good negotiation skills can also let you have access to useful classes and other gym services that will help you achieve your fitness goals.

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