Published On: Fri, Jan 25th, 2013

Worst Jobs in America

 Worst Jobs in AmericaYou may have had a day where you feel like you work at the worst job in the world. Maybe your demanding boss sucked the life out of you, or a coworker through you under the bus. Whatever the situation, it could be worse. There are some jobs that are actually life or death. You can rest assured that it gets better; at least you don’t risk dying on your job. Here are the most dangerous jobs in America.

Physical labor, demanding jobs, along with declining job opportunities, and a poor work environment can add to the high stress landscape.

Lumberjack

Timber harvesters rate at the bottom for job satisfaction along with safety, a low 10% in all of our ranking categories. Unemployment for Lumberjacks is extremely high. Although they work outside all day, which could seem like a nice perk, being a lumberjack is dangerous and dirty. They have to fight the elements, rain, snow, and sleet and hail their duty most go one.

Butcher

Rated as the worst most dangerous occupation many years in a row is a butcher. Aside from working with live animals and ensuring safety for themselves as well as the food, disease can spread if not careful. Many people prefer not to think about the behind the scenes of a butchers job, but the killing of animals is dangerous. There are a lot of issues that can arise and constantly fighting against public opinion and animal rights activists makes this job a high stress and high danger occupation.

Manufacture

Steel workers and manufacturing companies are extremely demanding and high stress. The machinery alone can be difficult to handle and proper training is required. Safety is important as moving machines can cut off limbs and put people in danger if not carful. It is important to consider the products you use daily and the amount of energy, labor and work that went into creating your products. Everything from your morning coffee to the car you drive was most likely created in a factory. Factory workers work hard often for little pay and demanding bosses. Consider the dangers of the job and think about your own safety.

For more advice on manufacturing, visit American Precision Industries, a machining Portland company. Shannon KAiser is a writer for API.

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