Published On: Sun, Nov 11th, 2012

5 Useful TED Talks on Health and Fitness

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5 Useful TED Talks on Health and FitnessThe Sapling Foundation created TED Talks (Technology, Entertainment and Design) in 1984 and celebrates the world’s best and brightest minds. Each year TED Talks holds a conference sharing new and innovative ideas. Each speaker discusses a particular topic that’s normally related to new studies and observations about people, science, and culture. Most of the presenters include famous political, science, and business leaders including former presidents and Nobel Prize winners. The talks are available for people to view online for free. TED Talks covers a range of topics, including health and fitness. Below are some of the most memorable health related discussions from past TED Talks conferences that you can use to improve your own health:

1. Aubrey de Grey: A Roadmap to End Aging

Aubrey de Grey is a Cambridge biogerontologist researcher that presented a TED Talks discussion in July 2005. He has an extensive academic background that focuses on studying the aging process. During the presentation he reveals there are distinct parallels between a person that is growing older and a person with a disease. The scientist believes that aging is just another disease and can eventually be cured through careful engineering. The researcher also believes that human beings age in seven different ways and has the ability to slow each process down or avert it. Challenging a traditional belief that getting old is inevitable, the British scholar stated that humans can defeat their biological clock through an approach called SENS or Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence.

2. Dan Buettner: How to live To Be 100+

Filmed in September 2009, Dan Buettner is a National Geographic writer that studies different cultures all over the world who live longer lives than the average person. Buettner and his research team study the secrets behind the longevity and good health in active centenarians around the world in areas coined the “blue zone”. Areas like Okinawa and Sardinia are known to have the oldest living populations. A person’s longevity is tied to their nine different healthy diet and lifestyle habits. He is also the founder of the Quest Network.

3. Dr. Dean Ornish: Your Genes Are Not Your Fate

Dr. Dean Ornish is a clinical professor at University of California, San Francisco who studies genetics. He founded the Preventive Medicine Research Institute and is considered a top cardiovascular and nutrition expert. During his presentation at TED Talks he discussed how a healthy diet can impact the quality of your life more than your genetic makeup.

Eating foods rich in antioxidants and minerals can help slow the aging process and help with cell regeneration. He also reveals that your brain cells can dramatically grow if you exercise and eat better, therefore affecting your genes. Dr. Ornish supports holistic health and a balanced lifestyle.

4. Bill Davenhall: Your Health Depends On Where You Live

Bill Davenhall presented at TED Talks in October of 2009 and showed research that revealed a person’s environment can affect their health just as much as diets and genetics. Davenhall supports adding a patient’s geographic and environmental data to their medical records so they can be treated more efficiently. Currently he works with a company that produces a geographic information system.

5. Lucien Engelen: Crowdsource Your Health

A brilliant technologist, Lucien Engelen is an innovative scientist that examines innovative ways to improve your health. During his April 20011 TED Talks he revealed a crowdsourced map of different local medical devices that are on your smart phone. Engelen is a professor at Singularity University and founded Reshape and Dutch Health 2.0 Ambassador, where he helps with promoting healthcare participation.

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Rich Barker is a nurse practitioner and guest author at Top Masters in Healthcare, where he contributed to the collection of Top 10 TED Talks on Healthcare.

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